Cystitis

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Cystitis

Cystitis is inflammation of the bladder, usually caused by a bacterial infection. It is more common in women, because the urethra is shorter and therefore easier for bacteria, which are often from the vagina or anus, to pass from the urethral opening to the bladder.

What to look for
Symptoms include an overwhelming and frequent need to pass urine, burning pain when doing so, and occasionally stress incontinence. The amounts of urine passed are medium, and it may be foul-smelling or cloudy or contain blood. There may be fever and sometimes a dull ache in the lower abdomen.

Causes
In men, infections and cystitis are less common and are most often the result of an obstruction, perhaps caused by an enlarged prostate gland. They should always be investigated. The bacterium which usually causes cystitis is a common one found in the intestinal tract, and it has most often been transferred by sexual intercourse or poor hygiene. Cystitis is common in pregnancy. Diabetics are also more susceptible to urinary tract infections. Cystitis in women at the onset of sexual activity should settle down without treatment, but it is advisable to empty the bladder after sexual intercourse to avoid aggravating the problem.

Dietary Considerations
Cranberry juice extracts is suggested to help prevent bacteria adhering to the bladder walls.

When to seek further professional advice
An attack of cystitis which lasts for longer than 48 hours or is associated with a high fever should be brought to the attention of your doctor

Alternative Treatment

Homeopathy, Naturopathy, Western Herbalism, Ayurvedic Medicine, Yoga, Hypnotherapy, Spiritual Healing, Aromatherapy, Reflexology, and Chinese herbalism are all the alternative treatments that will help to alleviate and treat Cystitis effectively.

Traditional Treatment

Treatment is usually with antibiotics along with plenty of fluids where infection is present. This will also prevent secondary infection of the kidneys. Other causes will be treated accordingly.

The information contained in this Site/Service is not intended nor is it implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice or taken for medical diagnosis or treatment.

Author - Body and Mind

Published - 2013-01-19